Thursday, October 8, 2015

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Farm Bureau eager for in-depth look at Trans-Pacific Partnership

Pacific Rim

Washington—The United States and 11 other Pacific Rim nations today formally agreed to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the biggest regional trade pact in history. The American Farm Bureau Federation looks forward to reviewing the details of the agreement to guarantee it fulfills the promise of opening restricted markets for American businesses around the Pacific Rim, AFBF President Bob Stallman said in a statement.

“We hope the agreement will bring a more level playing field for farmers and ranchers by reducing tariffs and removing non-science based barriers to trade,” Stallman said. “The agreement covers markets that are expected to grow rapidly for decades to come. We expect to see increased access for our agricultural products, particularly some meats.”

Stallman commended U.S. Trade Representative Froman and Chief Agricultural Negotiator Vetter for their longstanding support and determination to reach an agreement.

“Now it is up to us to figure out exactly what we have and how we should work with Congress to improve international market opportunities for U.S. farmers and ranchers through the Trans-Pacific Partnership,” Stallman said.

The full 30 chapters of the agreement, which was seven years in the making, will not available immediately.

Though the deal is done, President Barack Obama cannot sign the pact until 90 days after he officially announces his plan to do so. During that 90-day period, there will a great deal of back and forth over the details between the White House and Congress.

Congress earlier this year granted the president trade promotion authority, which means lawmakers are allowed only a yes-or-no vote without amendments for trade agreements.
Along with the U.S., the countries party to the agreement are: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. 

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