Thursday, February 4, 2016

Just in

Agri-Pulse poll: Trump leading the candidates in mostly Republican farm country


White House-smallFeb. 1, 2016-Most U.S. farmers and ranchers will vote Republican this November, according to a recently released Agri-Pulse poll. Among those who say they're backing a Republican, 40 percent want to see Donald Trump in the White House.  

The poll shows that regardless of age or farm size, farmers and ranchers want some big changes. 

"It's clear that GOP-leaning voters are very dissatisfied with the direction of the country, the way President Obama is doing his job and the way that Congress is doing its job. And there was not much variance by age or farm size, although a higher percentage of younger voters expressed dissatisfaction with how Congress is functioning," said Agri-Pulse Editor and founder Sara Wyant. "They want to elect someone who can make major changes." 

Among voters who identified as Republican or leaning Republican in the poll, 40 percent said they would vote for Donald Trump, compared to 15 percent for Sen. Ted. Cruz, 11 percent for Sen. Marco Rubio and 10 percent for Ben Carson.  Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee received slightly more than 4 percent of support and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had about 2 percent, while former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush was at 1.9 percent, businesswoman Carly Fiorina at 1.2 percent, Ohio Gov. John Kasich at 1 percent and Rick Santorum polling just below 1 percent. 

On the Democratic side, 19 percent of the 750 farmers and ranchers surveyed identified as Democrats or leaning Democrat.  Among those Democratic supporters, 49 percent favor former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders came in at 41 percent, while 10 percent of Democratic voters were undecided. 

The poll, conducted by Aimpoint Research, is part of the ongoing Agri-Pulse "Rural Route to the White House" series that is designed to help educate farmers and ranchers about how presidential candidates view national issues which are important to their livelihoods. The series is sponsored by the American Farm Bureau Federation.

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